2022 FIFA prize money: How much will the winners earn? | Breakdown of World Cup teams and players in Qatar

2022 FIFA prize money: How much will the winners earn? | Breakdown of World Cup teams and players in Qatar
2022 FIFA prize money: How much will the winners earn? | Breakdown of World Cup teams and players in Qatar

2022 FIFA prize money: How much will the winners earn? | Breakdown of World Cup teams and players in Qatar.

The 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar will have a large amount of money on the line.

Success on the field has real advantages, even though most teams will be focused on winning the coveted trophy and doing their countries proud.

FIFA hasn’t held back in recent years when it comes to World Cup prize money, and 2022 is no exception — there are record-breaking sums up for grabs.

The Sporting News breaks down the prize money up for grabs in Qatar and the potential winnings for each team here.

Total prize money at the 2022 World Cup

For the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, $440 million has been set aside by FIFA as prize money.

This represents an increase of $40 million over the 2018 competition, while the prize pool at the Brazil 2014 World Cup was only $358 million.

FIFA’s revenue budget for 2022 is $4.6 billion, a sizeable sum, with broadcasting rights expected to generate $2.6 billion of that total.

How much cash will be awarded to the 2022 World Cup champions?

The Qatar World Cup champions will receive a record $42 million in prize money, FIFA announced in April 2022.

The prize money for winners has increased by $4 million since 2018 and has been on an upward trend for the past 40 years.

Before 2006, World Cup champions were never paid more than $10 million, with Italy’s victory in 1982 earning them an estimated $2.2 million.

National teams made a strong push for FIFA to increase prize money in 2002, and growing World Cup revenue has since ensured that winning teams have received such payouts.

Year Prize money
(USD)
2022 $42m
2018 $38m
2014 $35m
2010 $30m
2006 $20m
2002 $8m
1998 $6m
1994 $4m
1990 $3.5m
1986 $2.8m
1982 $2.2m

How much will each team earn at the World Cup in 2022?

With such a large prize pool, each team will leave Qatar significantly richer.

Each team will receive a $1.5 million participation fee just for qualifying for the 2022 World Cup. However, after arriving at the tournament, teams can earn much more money by making it to the knockout rounds.

Teams that advance to the semifinals in Qatar will receive more money than the 2006 World Cup winners did, according to the FIFA prize money breakdown.

2022 Finish Prize money (USD)
Group stage $9m
Round of 16 $13m
Quarterfinals $17m
Fourth place $25m
Third place $27m
Runner-up $30m
Winner $42m

How does World Cup 2022 prize money compare to 2023 Women’s World Cup?

The 2023 Women’s World Cup in Australia and New Zealand will offer a total of $60 million in prize money, according to a prior announcement by FIFA.

It is double the estimated $30m that was given to women’s teams at the 2019 competition, even though it is more than seven times less than what will be offered at Qatar 2022.

The $15 million that FIFA reportedly contributed to the 2015 Women’s World Cup in Canada was doubled by that World Cup offering.

The prize money for the 2023 Women’s World Cup may be increased by another $100 million, according to a July report from The ABC.

The American men’s and women’s teams decided to split the total prize money they each won at the 2022 and 2023 World Cups in May.

“This is a truly historic moment. These agreements have changed the game forever here in the United States and have the potential to change the game around the world,” US Soccer president Cindy Parlow Cone said at the time.

“US Soccer and the USWNT and USMNT players have reset their relationship with these new agreements and are leading us forward to an incredibly exciting new phase of mutual growth and collaboration as we continue our mission to become the preeminent sport in the United States.”

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