The Cut attacked King Charles for being a ‘big, fussy kid and a blow to his staff’.

The eclectic magazine The Cut, which published an in-depth interview with the Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle, in August has targeted King Charles in a new piece published online on Wednesday.

The latest piece from the New York Magazine offshoot is titled: ‘The reign of riots of King Charles has begun,’ Which comes days before the Queen’s funeral, which is scheduled for Monday.

The article points to reports that Charles went through two ‘tantrums’ in the days following his mother’s death. There was a report that he was exiting a signing ceremony in Northern Ireland when a pen was leaked on him, another was when he was tailing and hissing at palace aides, who hurriedly moved the pen tray from his desk. failed to do. ,

King apparently gestured to the aides to help him make some space on a cluttered desk.

cut mentions a report Guardian In which it was alleged that Charles chose to tell about 100 staff that he was letting them go as he was preparing to go to Buckingham Palace during a memorial service for his mother. A source told the newspaper, “Everyone including the private secretaries and the senior team is completely shocked.”

In August, Markle told The Cut that she and Prince Harry were 'happy' to leave Britain and that they were 'disturbing the dynamics of the hierarchy' before stepping down as frontline royals and moving to North America.

In August, Markle told The Cut that she and Prince Harry were ‘happy’ to leave Britain and that they were ‘disturbing the hierarchical dynamics’ before stepping down as frontline royals and moving to North America… Just by existing’.

The latest attack from Charles III magazine comes less than a week after his mother died

The latest attack from Charles III magazine comes less than a week after his mother died

The article concludes by one of Meghan Markle’s many unsubstantiated allegations against Charles, that he was racist about his son Archie, and accuses him of ‘worldly cruelty’ to his wife, Princess Diana.

Notoriously, soon after the Queen’s death, The Cut published an article titled: ‘I will not cry over the death of a violent oppressor.’

The piece was an interview with Carnegie Mellon linguistics professor Uju Anya who tweeted on Thursday: ‘I heard the main king of a genocidal empire raping a thief is finally dying. May his pain be excruciating.’

Anya told The Cut that the queen was ‘representative of the cult of white womanhood’.

The Cut was launched as a section on New York Magazine’s website in 2008 and was created as a standalone brand in 2012. It is owned by Vox Media, which publishes titles such as Thrillist, Eater and The Verge.

It has published controversial deleted pieces such as a 2018 article that referred to Priyanka Chopra as a ‘global scam artist’ regarding her relationship with Nick Jonas and spread unconfirmed reports of sexual misconduct by men in journalism. There is an open forum for

Anya, an applied-linguistics professor at the University of Pittsburgh, is the daughter of a mother from Trinidad and a father from Nigeria.

He told NBC News that he is a ‘child of colonization’, and that his outlook is shaped by Britain’s role in the Nigerian Civil War.

“My earliest memories were of living in a war-torn area, and the reconstruction is still not complete,” he said.

He defended his remarks opposing the monarchy and said that the Queen was not exempted from decisions made by the British government ‘she looked after.’

Anya said, ‘Queen Elizabeth was the representative of the cult of white womanhood.

‘The notion that she was this little-old lady grandmother type, with her little hat and her purse and little dogs and everything, as if she lived in this place or this place imaginary, in this public image, who had ‘ He has no hand in the bloodshed of his crown.’

Uzu Anya, a black applied-linguistics professor at the University of Pittsburgh, said Friday: 'Queen Elizabeth was representative of the cult of white womanhood'

Uzu Anya, a black applied-linguistics professor at the University of Pittsburgh, said Friday: ‘Queen Elizabeth was representative of the cult of white womanhood’

Shortly before the Queen's passing was announced on Thursday, Anya tweeted that she expected her death to be 'excruciating'

Shortly before the Queen’s passing was announced on Thursday, Anya tweeted that she expected her death to be ‘excruciating’

In August, Markle told The Cut that what the couple sought was not ‘reinventing the wheel’ when they wanted financial independence.

The article was also heard from Harry who suggested that some members of the royal family ‘have not been able to work and be together’, while Meghan revealed that her husband told her she ‘lost’ her father, Prince Charles Is.

Meghan also added: ‘I’m back… on Instagram’ – with Davis describing her ‘eyes fine and devilish’. This comes after she shut down all her social media accounts before her wedding with Harry in 2018. But at the bottom of the article, it says: ‘Later, Meghan would relay that she was no longer sure she would actually return to Instagram.’

And Meghan said she spoke to a Lion King cast member from South Africa in London in 2019 who told her: ‘When you married into this family, we were as happy in the streets as we did when Mandela was released from prison. Did it on being.’

Meghan said she and Prince Harry were ‘delighted’ to leave the UK and ‘disturbing the hierarchical dynamics … from just existing’ before stepping down as frontline royals and moving to North America.

Before the release of their interview, The Cut published an article titled: ‘People will accuse Meghan Markle of lying about anything.’ That piece dealt with Markle’s claim that Archie’s room was set on fire before the former royal couple attended an event, and cited allegations from several commentators that the incident was exaggerated.

Queen Elizabeth II's funeral crew is pictured walking along The Royal Mile towards St Giles' Cathedral on September 12

Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral crew is pictured walking along The Royal Mile towards St Giles’ Cathedral on September 12

Britons gathered to pay tribute as a vehicle carrying the Queen's coffin passed on Monday

Britons gathered to pay tribute as a vehicle carrying the Queen’s coffin passed on Monday

The Cut reported today that Meghan, 41, listed “a handful of princes and princesses and dukes who have the same arrangement they wanted”, although the article does not name any of them.

And Meghan, speaking to New York-based feature writer Alison P. Davis, said: ‘That, for whatever reason, is not something we were allowed to do, even if many other family members do the exact same thing.’

When asked ‘Why do you feel that way?’, she simply replied: ‘Why do you feel that way?’, interviewer Davis said she said it ‘right behind with a side-eye that suggests it that I must understand without understanding can be said’.

The article said Harry and Meghan suggested to ‘The Firm’ they should be allowed to act on behalf of the monarchy but could make their own money, with the Duchess saying: ‘Then maybe all the noise Will be done.’

The article says: ‘They also thought it best to leave the UK (and the UK press) to do it. They were ready to go to basically any Commonwealth, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, anywhere.

“Anything just… because just by being existing, we were disturbing the dynamics of the hierarchy. So we go, ‘Okay, okay, let’s get out of here. Happily,’ she says, raising her hands in a fake necklace.

Meghan claims what they were asking for was not ‘re-inventing the wheel’ and lists a handful of princes and princesses and dukes who have had the arrangement they wanted.

“That, for whatever reason, is not something we were allowed to do, even though many other family members do exactly that.”

‘Why do you think so? i ask. ‘Why do you think so?’ She says it right behind the side eye which suggests that I should understand without telling.’

The Duchess was asked during the interview whether pardons could exist between her and her own family as well as members of the royal family.

She told The Cut: ‘I think forgiveness is really important. It takes a lot of energy not to forgive. But it takes a lot of effort to forgive. I have really put in a proactive effort, especially knowing that I can say anything.’

The article also mentions Meghan’s estranged father Thomas Markle, a retired lighting director who now lives in Mexico.

The report said Meghan discussed how the two families were ‘scattered’.

And it quotes Meghan as saying: ‘Harry told me, ‘I lost my father in the process.’ It is not necessarily the same for them as it was for me, but it is their decision.

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